Field Trips

The western Columbia Basin has seen a wholesale conversion from dry shrub-steppe to irrigated cropland. Increased runoff has caused water tables to rise, flooding innumerable potholes and other low-lying spots and creating a diverse, bird-rich mix of habitats. From the Columbia River to Moses Lake, I-90 provides access to cliffs, marshes, lakes, and remnant patches of shrub-steppe, large areas of which are managed by state and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

From A Birder’s Guide to Washington, 2nd Edition

What to bring

Remember to bring your National Parks/Forest Pass, Discover Pass, and FRS radios to use during field trips. For your safety, become familiar with possible dangers in the area and arrive prepared. Intense sun, poison oak, rattlesnakes, ticks, mosquitoes, and steep/uneven terrain area are natural hazards in some areas. Select trips that are appropriate for your fitness level, both for your safety and in consideration of your trip co-participants.

eBirding

Whether or not to eBird a trip is left to the preferences of leaders and participants. Leaders are not expected to eBird for their groups, as they have many other things to be concerned about, but some may choose to do so.

Playback

WOS has received comments regarding playback. Therefore, leaders were asked to indicate: “no playback allowed,” “limited playback allowed” or “playback allowed.” The latter is the least restrictive option.

Departures

Full-day trips will depart at 5:30 a.m. and return by 4 p.m., except for trips with longer driving times, where departure is at 5:15 a.m. Check the trip description for the exact departure time for each trip. Half-day trips will depart at 6 a.m. and return by noon.

All times listed for trips are departure times, so please arrive at least 10-15 minutes early to check in with your trip leader and for the carpooling arrangements. Trip leaders will have signs with the trip name in the designated meeting area.

Reimburse your driver

It is the responsibility of the participants to reimburse their driver. Remind the driver to set the odometer before departure. WOS recommends that drivers be reimbursed by a rate of 0.25 per mile divided by the number of passengers in the car (not including the driver). For example if a trip is 100 miles in length and three passengers are in the car, each person would contribute $8.33 for mileage reimbursement to the driver.


On-the-Way Trips

On the way trips are designed to optimize your birding experience by taking advantage of routes that can be birded while taking you in the general direction of your destination (to Moses Lake on Thursday and on the way home on Monday). We would like to encourage participants to carpool both coming to and leaving from the conference! Communicate with the trip leader regarding exact meeting time and location.

Davenport to Moses Lake

Leader: Kim Thorburn

This Going-To field trip will bird BLM Telford and Twin Lakes Units, Swanson Lakes Wildlife Area, and BLM Wilson Creek Unit. Time permitting, we will bird Billy Clapp Reservoir and Soap Lake. Possible species include Wilson’s Phalarope, Swainson’s Hawk, Gray Partridge, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Loggerhead Shrike, Sage Thrasher, Yellow-breasted Chat, and Brewer’s and Grasshopper Sparrow.

The field trip will begin from the Safeway parking lot on the west side of Davenport, WA at 7:00 a.m. Thursday

Tacoma (and Seattle) to Moses Lake

Leaders: Faye McAdams Hands and Diane Yorgason-Quinn

We will meet at 7:00 a.m. Thursday at the Park & Ride at Exit 143 off I-5. We will check spots at Snoqualmie Pass for American Dipper, MacGillivray’s Warbler and possible Sooty Grouse, and then continue on for a brief stop at Lake Easton State Park. We will stop at a few places near Cle Elum – including along SR-10 – to check for Dipper, Bank Swallow, Gray Catbird and Veery. If there is time, we will stop at Vantage Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park.

For this Going-To trip, meet at 7:00 a.m. at the Park & Ride on 23rd Avenue South & South 320th Street in Federal Way. Use Exit 143 off I-5.

Vancouver going to Moses Lake

Leader: Randy Hill

This Going-To trip leaves at 7 a.m. Thursday from the Steigerwald Lake parking lot along SR-14 and makes short stops at several locations en route that could include Lyle-Balch Cemetery and Brooks Memorial State Park in Klickitat County, Toppenish NWR in Yakima County, and along the Old Vantage Highway in Kittitas County.  The last leg will be determined from remaining time available, directly to Moses Lake on I-90 or indirectly via SR-26 and Dodson Road, the Royal Slope, or Othello.  Discover Pass and 2-way radios helpful.

Half-day Trips

All of the following trips will be leaving from the assigned carpooling area at 6:00 a.m.

1. City Parks in Ephrata (Patrick, Lions, Oasis Parks and Cemetery) and Soap Lake (Grant County)

30 minutes one way
Leaders:
Friday: Penny Rose/Scott Hoskin (No Playback Allowed),
Saturday:Brian Bell (Limited Playback Allowed)
Sunday:Faye McAdams Hands and Diane Yorgason-Quinn (Limited Playback Allowed)

Half-day trip with casual walking and public facilities. Ephrata, in general, is a typical eastern Washington migrant trap and its parks provide great public access. Anna’s Hummingbird, a difficult species to find in Grant County, can be found at Oasis Park. Species expected include Yellow-rumped, Wilson’s, Orange-crowned and Townsend’s Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Black-headed Grosbeak, Bullock’s Oriole, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hammond’s and Pacific-slope Flycatcher. Soap Lake is known for providing surprises, often shorebirds or unusual waterfowl such as scoters. Species expected include a variety of waterfowl, Chukar, Ring-necked Duck, White-throated Swift, and Eared and Horned Grebes.

2. Columbia NWR (Grant and Adams counties)

Leaders:
Friday: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Staff
Saturday: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Staff
Sunday: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Staff

NOTE: This trip will begin at the Columbia NWR Office; directions to the office will be provided. We strongly encourage the participants to meet at the designated Best Western Plus Lake Front Hotel meeting spot and carpool to the refuge office. Refuge staff will be expecting all participants by 7:00 a.m.

Half-day trip requiring moderate driving times and little walking. Columbia National Wildlife Refuge is an oasis of wetlands and lakes surrounded by shrub-steppe habitats. Because the refuge has abundant water habitats, several species of waterfowl can be found including Cinnamon Teal. Uplands provide opportunities to find Long-billed Curlew, Western Meadowlark, Loggerhead Shrike and Swainson’s Hawk. Riparian habitats found throughout the refuge offer Bullock’s Oriole, Eastern Kingbird, Great Horned Owl, Warbling Vireo, Willow Flycatcher, Yellow Warbler and a variety of other migrating warblers. Shallow wetlands will provide American Pipit, rails, Marsh Wren and a variety of shorebirds, including Black-necked Stilt, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Long-billed Dowitcher and Least Sandpiper.

3. Gloyd Seeps, Blue Heron Park, Neppel Park (Grant County)

Leaders:
Friday: Ken Brown and Ed Pullen (Playback Allowed)
Saturday: Michael Hobbs (Playback Allowed)

Half-day trip requiring easy walking and short driving times. Explore wetlands, wetland-riparian, lake- and park-like riparian habitats around Moses Lake. This time of year can bring a mix of landbird, shorebird and waterbird migrations. Birds expected include Blue-winged and Cinnamon Teal, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Marsh Wren, Swainson’s Hawk, Long-billed Curlew, warblers such as Townsend’s, Nashville, Orange-crowned, Wilson’s, MacGillivray’s and Yellow. Also Warbling Vireo, Bullock’s Oriole, American White Pelican, and a number of flycatchers such as Willow, Dusky, Olive-sided, Western Kingbird and Western Wood-Pewee. Possible are Long-eared Owl, Common Poorwill, White-faced Ibis, Prairie Falcon, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Bonaparte’s and Franklin’s Gull.

4. North Potholes Reserve and Potholes Wildlife Area (Grant County)

15 minutes one way
Leaders:
Friday: Eric Dudley (Playback Allowed)
Saturday: Tom Bancroft (Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Ken Brown and Ed Pullen (Playback Allowed)

This is a half-day trip that requires little walking. Explore the north Pothole Lake. Although waterbirds may dominate the trip, there are good opportunities for land birds throughout and especially at North Potholes Reserve. While driving in, look for Swainson’s Hawks and Loggerhead Shrike scan the lake for Common Loon, three species of grebes, Common Goldeneye, Herring Gull, and Forster’s Tern. Shallow water can produce Blue-winged and Cinnamon Teal, Marsh Wren, Black Tern, Black-necked Stilt, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Baird’s Sandpiper and Greater Yellowlegs. North Potholes Reserve offers a large rookery used by wading birds, including Black-crowned Night-Heron, and riparian habitat where Wood Duck, several species of warbler, Bullock’s Oriole, Black-headed Grosbeak, Western Tanager, Bewick’s and House Wren can be found. Surrounding shrub-steppe offers both Western and Eastern Kingbird and Say’s Phoebe.

5. Potholes State Park, Winchester Wasteway (Road C-SE), and Dodson Road (Grant County)

30 minutes one way
Leaders:
Friday: Bruce LaBar (Playback Allowed)
Saturday: Kim Thorburn (No Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Brian Bell (Limited Playback Allowed)

This is a half-day trip that requires moderate walking. Potholes State Park, a known vagrant trap, is the highlight of this trip. The park is found along the west edge of Potholes Reservoir and is a popular camping park that provides tall trees and riparian habitats surrounded by extensive shrub-steppe habitat. Also we will visit Winchester Wasteway and Dodson Road. These locations include shallow wetlands (Birder’s Corner and Audubon Trail) and waterways through shrub-steppe and riparian habitats. Expected birds include Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Wilson’s Warblers, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Bewick’s and House Wren, Song, Chipping, Golden-crowned, White-crowned and Lincoln’s Sparrow. Water-associated birds include Blue-winged Teal, American Avocet, Spotted, Least And Baird’s Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs And Long-Billed Dowitcher. Searching the reservoir can provide a number of gulls, terns and grebes, Common Loon and waterfowl. Possible species to be seen include Lewis’s Woodpecker, Prairie And Peregrine Falcon.

6. Scooteney Reservoir (Grant, Adams, Franklin counties)

50 minutes one way
Leaders:
Friday: Kevin Black (Limited Playback Allowed)

Half-day trip requiring long drive time and light to moderate level walking. A large reservoir dominating shrub-steppe habitat, Scootney provides an opportunity to find water- and shrub-oriented birds in a small area. Here American White Pelican can be found as well as a large variety of waterfowl. Land birds expected include Western and Eastern Kingbird, Horned Lark, Western Meadowlark, and Bullock’s Oriole to mention a few. Depending on water levels, shorebirds are possible. Both Peregrine And Prairie Falcon could be found soaring overhead, while Swainson’s Hawks forge in nearby fields. Driving the Coyan Road, Schoolaney (Scooteney) Road, Hendricks Road, and Sagehill Road Loop will provide winnowing Snipe, Common Yellowthroat, Lazuli Bunting, Lark Sparrow, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Eastern Kingbird and several sparrows and swallows. A possibility is a Ferruginous Hawk or Golden Eagle passing through. In the shrub-steppe, one could find Loggerhead Shrikes hunting and flocks of sparrows. Occasionally Tricolored Blackbirds have been found around the reservoir.

7. Rarity Chase (Monday Only)

Leaders:
Bob Flores and Randy Hill (Limited Playback Allowed)

Half-day Monday-only trip requiring long driving periods in between multiple stops. This trip will allow a group to chase after birds of interest found throughout the Conference.

Full-day Trips

All of the following trips will be leaving from the assigned carpooling area (Best Western Plus Lake Front Hotel). Please note the departure time is 5:30 a.m. unless otherwise noted in the trip description. Trips with long morning drives depart at 5:15 a.m.

8. Beezley Hills, Moses Coulee, Jameson Lake (Grant, Douglas counties)

60 minutes one way to Jameson Lake
Leaders:
Friday: Scott Ramos (Limited Playback Allowed)
Saturday: Mike & MerryLynn Denny (Limited Playback Allowed)

NOTE: Departure time is 5:15 a.m. A full-day trip requiring long driving times and moderate hiking. Spend the day visiting three areas of shrub-steppe, grasslands and lakes. Wildflowers may be abundant at this time. The Nature Conservancy properties protect intact quality shrub-steppe habitats where a rich variety of birds may be found, including Lazuli Bunting, Common Goldeneye, Poorwill, Mountain Bluebird, Loggerhead Shrike, Rock and Canyon Wren, White-throated Swift, Golden Eagle, Sage Thrasher, and Sage, Vesper and Brewer’s Sparrow. In addition, Jameson Lake offers three teal species, Ruddy Duck and Barrow’s Goldeneye.

9. Douglas Creek (Grant, Douglas counties)

1 hour 15 minutes one way
Leaders:
Saturday: Dan Stephens (Limited Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Dan Stephens (Limited Playback Allowed)

NOTE: Departure is at 5:15 a.m. Full-day trip requiring long driving times and moderate hiking. Douglas Creek Canyon is at the SW corner of Douglas County and drains the Waterville Plateau. It is comprised of 5,370 hectares (13,269 acres) of well-established riparian habitat dominated by Black Cottonwood, Water Birch, and willow; surrounded by shrub-steppe uplands and basalt cliffs. A couple of stops along the way will provide an opportunity for Swainson’s Hawk and Grasshopper Sparrow. Most of the time will be spent in the canyon. Likely species include Bullock’s Oriole, Lazuli Bunting, Chukar, Rock and House Wren, Say’s Phoebe and Lark Sparrow. Possibilities include Golden Eagle, Common Poorwill, Dusky Flycatcher, Gray Catbird, Canyon Wren and Black-chinned Hummingbird.

10. Highway 21, Odessa, Wilson Creek, Soap Lake (Adams, Lincoln, Grant counties)

Leaders:
Friday: Randy Hill (Limited Playback Allowed)
Saturday: Scott and Sierra Downes (Limited Playback Allowed),
Sunday: Kevin Black (Limited Playback Allowed)

Full-day trip requiring long driving times some walking on mostly level ground. This trip travels through Adams County shrub-steppe and dryland wheat to Crab Creek in Lincoln County, then westward to mixed riparian and open landscapes of Grant County through Wilson Creek and Soap Lake. Targets include breeding sparrows, shorebirds and waterfowl, Sage Thrasher, Loggerhead Shrike, Tricolored Blackbird, Ferruginous Hawk and migrants of all types. Spring runoff will establish Crab Creek flood stage and some interesting possibilities.

11. Northrup Canyon (Grant County)

One hour and 15 minutes one way
Leaders:
Saturday: Matt Yawney
Sunday: Matt Yawney

NOTE: Departure is at 5:15 a.m. Full-day trip requiring long drive time and strenuous hiking. If hiking all the way to the “lake,” it would likely be 4-5 hours.  That can be a somewhat tough hike because as the trail gets further into the canyon there is some significant climbing and descending.  There’s also a rocky portion before the climbing.  So if the people on the trip are not up to these challenges, we might go in only about 1-2 miles.  All the way to the lake is about 4 miles. Up to 55 species are expected. Golden Eagle is regular there; House Wren is abundant. Expect Cassin’s Finch, Cassin’s Vireo, Canyon and Rock Wren, White-throated Swift, Yellow-breasted Chat, Lazuli Bunting, and Calliope Hummingbird.

12. Para/McCain Ponds, Lower Crab Creek Road, Corfu Woods, and SR-26 Saline Pond (Grant, Adams counties)

35 minutes one way
Leaders:
Saturday: Randy Hill Limited Playback Allowed),
Sunday: Bob Flores (Limited Playback Allowed)

Full-day trip which requires a lot of vehicle time and little walking. A variety of bird species are targeted including Tricolored Blackbird, Wilson’s And Red-necked Phalarope, Black-necked Stilt, American Avocet and possible Long-eared and Burrowing Owl. Spring waterfowl and shorebird migration could provide surprises. Driving Lower Crab Creek road, look for Loggerhead Shrikes and Lark Sparrows perched on fence lines. Corfu Woods, a migrant trap, offers opportunities to find Townsend’s, Orange-crowned, Wilson’s, MacGillivray’s, Nashville and Yellow-rumped warblers, both warbling and Cassin’s Vireo, Hammond’s, Dusky, Pacific-slope Flycatcher and both Golden-crowned and Ruby-crowned Kinglets. Long-billed Curlew and Loggerhead Shrike are often seen in adjacent fields. Potential birds include Townsend’s Solitaire, Lewis’s Woodpecker and Gray Flycatcher.

13. Quincy Lakes WMA (Grant County)

45 min one way
Leaders:
Friday: Michael Hobbs (Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Kim Thorburn (No Playback Allowed)

Full-day trip including a moderate hiking trip. Most of this unit is well vegetated with perennial plants. Big sage/bluebunch wheatgrass is the most common plant community. Several of the potholes are filled. These wetlands, ponds and lakes have added an important diversity to the habitat of this area. Expected birds include Black-necked Stilt, White-throated Swift, Say’s Phoebe, Lark Sparrow, Canyon, House, Marsh and Bewick’s Wren, Eastern Kingbird, Bullock’s Oriole, Warbling Vireo, Chipping Sparrow, winnowing Wilson’s Snipe and several species of waterfowl. Possibilities include Gray Partridge, Sage Thrasher, Forster’s Tern, Virginia Rail, Lewis’s Woodpecker and Yellow-breasted Chat.

14. Sentinel Bluffs, Wanapum Dam, and Desert Aire (possible) (Grant County)

45 minutes one way
Leaders:
Saturday: Bruce LaBar (Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Scott and Sierra Downs (Limited Playback Allowed)

Full-day trip requiring long drive time and moderate-level walking. Found along the Columbia River in Grant County is a riparian strip guarded by Sentinel Bluff. This trip will involve a long casual walk and a stop at Wanapum Dam. White-throated Swifts and swallows soar around the bluff while Chukars call out. Migrants stop at this trap to forage before moving on. On the river, a variety of ducks can be seen as well pelicans, gulls, and occasional loons and terns. Expected birds include Eastern And Western Kingbird, Bullock’s Oriole, House Wren And sparrow flocks to name a few. Migrants could include a variety of warblers, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Warbling Vireo, Gray Catbird and several flycatchers. Scanning the river from Wanapum Dam could result in seeing loons, a variety of gulls and waterbird species.

15. Sprague Lake, Sprague Sewer Ponds, Sheep Lake, Crooked Knee, Cow Lake (Lincoln, Whitman, Adams counties)

One hour one way
Leaders:
Saturday: Jon Isacoff (Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Randy Hill (Limited Playback Allowed)

NOTE: Departure is at 5:15 a.m. Full-day trip requiring long driving times, roadside stops, light walking at public access areas. The Sprague area can be a haven for migrants during May. We should have strong showings of waterfowl, migrant shorebirds, gulls, terns, and passerines. Stops will include Sprague Lake, Sprague Sewage lagoons, Sprague Lake resort ($3 per person required), Sprague Cemetery, and Sheep Lake. Target species include Franklin’s Gull, Black Tern, American Avocet, Black-necked Stilt, Wilson’s Phalarope, White-faced Ibis, Tricolored Blackbird, and migrant empids, vireos, and warblers.

16. Sun Lakes, Lake Lenore, Alkali Lake, Blue Lake, Dry Falls (Grant County)

45 minutes one way
Leaders:
Friday: Doug Schonewald (Limited Playback Allowed)
Saturday: Bob Flores (Limited Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Doug Schonewald (Limited Playback Allowed)

Full-day trip requiring long driving times, roadside stops, light walking at public access areas. Travel north on SR-17 through the Grand Coulee past chains of lakes surrounded by shrub-steppe habitat and stopping along the way to scan for waterbirds, raptors and Chukars. The trip ends at Sun Lakes State Park, a known vagrant trap, where the group will look for migrants and waterbirds. Expected are White-throated Swift, Warbling Vireo, Western Wood-Pewee, Lazuli Bunting, Black-headed Grosbeak, sparrow flocks, including Lark, Song, White-crowned, Golden-crowned and Chipping. Warblers are found in riparian habitat, including Townsend’s, Orange-crowned, Wilson’s, Mcgillivray’s, Nashville, Yellow-breasted Chat And Yellow-rumped. Possible birds include Prairie Falcon, Long-eared Owl, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Evening Grosbeak and Common Poorwill.

17. Wanapum State Park, Ginkgo Petrified State Park, Old Vantage Highway, Quilomene WMA (Kittitas County)

55 minutes one way
Leaders:
Friday: Tom Bancroft (Playback Allowed)
Saturday: Kevin Black (Limited Playback Allowed)
Sunday: Scott Ramos (Limited Playback Allowed)

NOTE: Departure time is 5:15 a.m. Full-day trip that requires light walking. Two well-known migrant traps in Kittitas County are on this trip. Expected migrants include kinglets, Black-headed Grosbeak, Western Tanager, variety of warblers and groups of sparrows. Sage areas around Ginkgo Petrified S.P. normally have singing Sage Thrashers while Chukars and Canyon Wrens call from the cliffs along Old Vantage Road. Wanapum State Park is dominated by riverine riparian habitat and surrounded by shrub-steppe. In this migrant trap, several species of warblers are expected as well as Warbling Vireo, Bullock’s Oriole, Red-breasted Nuthatch and Western Tanager. While at the two sites above, scan the Columbia River for grebes, Common Loon and American White Pelican. Quilomene WMA provides trails through shrub-steppe-dominated coulees where sparrow flocks flourish. Also expected are Bullock’s Oriole, California Quail, Rock Wren and Chukar.

18. Washtucna, Hooper, Hatton Coulee, Palouse Falls Park (possible) (Grant, Adams, Franklin, Whitman counties)

One and a half hours one way
Leaders:
Friday: Bob Flores (Limited Playback Allowed),
Sunday: Mike and MerryLynn Denny (Limited Playback Allowed)

NOTE: Departure time is 5:15 a.m. Full-day trip requiring long driving times, roadside stops, light walking at public access areas. Bassett Park located in the small town of Washtucna is the best migrant trap known in Adams County. Multiple species of warblers, flycatchers are very possible. Also kinglets, sparrows, vireos and other migrants should be found. The small community of Hooper includes both Adams and Whitman Counties and is a good location to find Lesser Goldfinch. If time permits, the tour will continue to Palouse Falls State Park where White-throated Swift, Peregrine Falcon and migrant songbirds are expected. On the entrance road to the park, Ferruginous Hawk and Grasshopper Sparrow are possible.

Breakdown by Days

The above-listed 18 trips on this page are broken down here by day.

Friday

Half-day Trips
1. City Parks in Ephrata (Penny Rose/Scott Hoskin)
2. Columbia NWR (USFWS Staff)
3. Gloyd Seeps, Blue Heron Park, Neppel Park (Ken Brown and Ed Pullen)
4. North Potholes Reserve and Potholes Wildlife Area (Eric Dudley)
5. Potholes State Park, Winchester Wasteway ( Rd C-SE), Dodson Rd (Bruce LaBar)
6. Scooteney Reservoir (Kevin Black)

Full-day Trips
8. Beezley Hills, Moses Coulee, Jameson Lake (Scott Ramos)
10. Highway 21, Odessa, Wilson Creek, Soap Lake (Randy Hill)
13. Quincy Lakes WMA (Michael Hobbs)
16. Sun Lakes, Lake Lenore, Alkali Lake, Blue Lake (Doug Schonewald)
17. Wanapum State Park, Ginkgo Petrified State Park, – Old Vantage Highway, Quilomene WMA (Tom Bancroft)
18. Washtucna, Hooper, Hatton Coulee, Palouse Falls Park (possible) (Bob Flores)

Saturday

Half-day Trips
1. City Parks in Ephrata (Brian Bell)
2. Columbia NWR (USFWS Staff)
3. Gloyd Seeps, Blue Heron Park, Neppel Park (Michael Hobbs)
4. North Potholes Reserve and Potholes Wildlife Area (Tom Bancroft)
5. Potholes State Park, Winchester Wasteway (Road C-SE), and Dodson Road (Kim Thorburn)

Full-day Trips
8. Beezley Hills, Moses Coulee, Jameson Lake (Mike & MerryLynn Denny)
9. Douglas Creek (Dan Stephens)
10. Highway 21, Odessa, Wilson Creek, Soap Lake (Scott and Sierra Downes)
11. Northrup Canyon (Matt Yawney)
12. Para/McCain Ponds, Lower Crab Creek Road, Corfu Woods, and SR-26 Saline Pond (Randy Hill)
14. Sentinel Bluffs, Wanapum Dam, and Desert Aire (Bruce LaBar)
15. Sprague Lake, Sprague Sewer Ponds, Sheep Lake, Crooked Knee, Cow Lake (Jon Isacoff)
16. Sun Lakes, Lake Lenore, Alkali Lake, Blue Lake, Dry Falls (Bob Flores)
17. Wanapum State Park, Ginkgo Petrified State Park, Old Vantage Highway, Quilomene WMA (Kevin Black)

Sunday

Half-day Trips
1. City Parks in Ephrata (Faye McAdams Hands and Diane Yorgason-Quinn)
2. Columbia NWR (USFWS Staff)
4. North Potholes Reserve and Potholes Wildlife Area (Ken Brown and Ed Pullen)
5. Potholes State Park, Winchester Wasteway (Road C-SE), and Dodson Road (Brian Bell)

Full-day Trips
9. Douglas Creek (Dan Stephens)
10. Highway 21, Odessa, Wilson Creek, Soap Lake (Kevin Black)
11. Northrup Canyon (Matt Yawney)
12. Para/McCain Ponds, Lower Crab Creek Road, Corfu Woods, and SR-26 Saline Pond (Bob Flores)
13. Quincy Lakes WMA (Kim Thorburn)
14. Sentinel Bluffs, Wanapum Dam, and Desert Aire (possible) (Scott and Sierra Downes)
15. Sprague Lake, Sprague Sewer Ponds, Sheep Lake, Crooked Knee, Cow Lake (Randy Hill)
16. Sun Lakes, Lake Lenore, Alkali Lake, Blue Lake, Dry Falls (Doug Schonewald)
17. Wanapum State Park, Ginkgo Petrified State Park, Old Vantage Highway, Quilomene WMA (Scott Ramos)
18. Washtucna, Hooper, Hatton Coulee, Palouse Falls Park (possible) (Mike & MerryLynn Denny)

Monday

Half-day Trip
7. Rarity Chase (Bob Flores and Randy Hill)